Thursday, April 21, 2016

"Uncle Sam's Hat" Rug Hooking Design

Finally I've come up with a design for my next hooking project.

After playing around with some of my own designs, searching the Internet and scouring through my book collection of patterns and designs I ran across this design below by Polly Minick (second photo).  

I finally decided that I didn't need to reinvent the wheel but come up with something I liked that would play happily next to my family room Oriental rug (see below).  The added bonus was that the colors were already right for where I needed to place the rug.  Perfect!  

The bumped out area on the front of the TV cabinet is approx. 50".  I did not want to make the rug longer because it would start crowding into a chair and ottoman on the left side and a spinning wheel/chair on the other side of the cabinet so 50" is what I finally decided on.


 Perfect colors to play happily with my Oriental rug in family room.

Line drawing in the book.


Paper taped together to get the right size I needed (28" x 50") and now in the process of free hand drawing the design on to the paper.

Speaking of paper, I have been working off a 500 sheet ream of moving company packing paper I was left with after our move to Maine in 1992!  This is a great resource and I have more info further back on my blog about using this paper in the article on "Designing Rugs."

Thought you might like to see where I work in my studio weaving,  sewing, cutting out patterns and painting. 

 Paper laid out with a large piece of poster board between my sketching and the cutting table mat along with my tools.
 One photo of my work table and two of my four looms in my studio.
Big loom in front of the window is a Cranbrook 60" maple loom, 8 shafts and 12 treadles with a shaft switching device (that's a story for another day).  The loom on the left is a Leclerc 45" tapestry loom with two treadles.

Another photo of studio and another 60"loom, book cases, threading bench for back of Cranbrook loom.

Drawing in progress and starting to add felt tip pin over the pencil lines.

This loom in the photo is a 60" J-Made 16 shaft loom with 3 worm gears to crank the take up of warp onto the front beam and move the warp off one of the two back beams.  Lots of treadles and mind blowingly beautiful since it is made of all cherry wood!  Woven lots of fabric on this loom along with a few rugs! 

Sewing area with two Viking sewing machines and lots of storage.

By the way, this is as clean as it ever gets, LOL!  I can guarantee that it can get a whole lot messier if I'm deep into several projects at the same time!
Wall of cabinets along back wall of room with a ledge for my wet paintings in progress along with a sink for brush clean up or whatever else I need water for.  An old computer to the right that sits there lonely and forgotten since I have a 27" IMAC in my painting area.  Should get rid of it but you know how that goes - just haven't gotten around to it (for years)!

 Another view of sewing/cutting/drawing table.

Sewing table with a look towards the other end of the room where you can see some of my painting area, easels, shadow box and an iMAC computer plus storage.

About now you are drooling over my studio and its size but I look at this room as a lifetime of vacations that I've never taken, LOL!  Enough said!

Okay, back to the Minick design drawing.

Half of the design sketched in and gone over with a felt tip pen.


 Finally the finished drawing!
  I made some modifications to the original....little tweeks here and there but minor.  Now I have to transfer this drawing to either linen or cotton rug hooking material.

I'm on my way to starting the hooking.....except for all those copies I have to trace yet.

2 comments:

Cormac said...

Awesome stuff, enjoyed reading. Great talent btw. The rug in your picture reminded me off one I bought online here

Van Huss Fine Art said...

Thank you Cormac for visiting, your compliment and the website link for rugs. Some great inspiration, particularly the children's rugs, for rug hookers. Ideas are everywhere on the Internet. We all just need to pay attention to them. Come visit again.